Tuesday

Breaking News RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2014 Medal Winners Announced

Chelsea Flower Show Medals Announced!

Congratulations to the Laurent-Perrier Garden, Best Show Garden, and all the award winners at the 2014  RHS Chelsea Flower Show!  I am of course delighted that I called the best in show winner in my MyGardenSchool predictions blog from seeing the show gardens yesterday!

Congratulations to Luciano Giubbilei - well deserved.

Chelsea Flower Show 2014

Chelsea Flower Show Gardens - Winners

Best Show Garden

The Laurent-Perrier Garden

Designed by Luciano Giubbilei

Best Fresh Garden

The Mind's Eye

Designed by LDC Design

Chelsea Flower Show 2014

Best Artisan Garden

Togenkyo – A Paradise on Earth

Designed by Kazuyuki Ishihara

Gold Medallists.

Great Pavilion

RHS Chelsea Plant of the Year 2014
Hydrangea macrophylla Miss Saori (‘H20-2’)

Ryoji Irie

Diamond Jubilee Award

South West in Bloom

President’s Award

Birmingham City Council

Best RHS Discovery exhibit

Sparsholt College

All Great Pavilion awards download (114kB pdf)

Friday

“A Game of Contrast” Former Students win Best Festival Garden 2014, RHS Malvern

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This is a blog by former student Ana Mari Bull who along with former fellow student Lorenzo Soprani won Best Festival Garden 2014, RHS Malvern.

How many of us dream of creating a show garden as soon as we graduate, but are put off because of the lack of funding or sponsorship? Years can go by and you get more involved in building up your practice, but the dream is still there, tucked away at the back of your brain, behind the planting plans and construction drawings that need to be finished yesterday. As you take on more work, you can feel the dream becoming more and more distant.

This was how I felt last year; I was up to my eyes in work, so I turned to my friend and fellow student Lorenzo Soprani for help. We worked really well together and it made the lonely existence of a freelance designer more bearable. In turn, he would pass work onto me when I was quiet on the work front. We soon found that we were in fact collaborating on every project we did, so in effect had become one practice. Work started to dry up towards the end of last year and the dream started to wiggle its way back to the front of our minds.

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Lorenzo picks up the story here, “It was late in January when my colleague and friend Ana and I decided to have a go at designing a show garden. To be honest I was not particularly busy and it is when the mind is at rest that those ideas spring to mind! But with not much income and no name so to speak to bring in financial backing, the chances of us being able to afford to do a show garden was still very much a distant dream. So having looked around for an opportunity I discovered that the RHS was re-launching the Malvern Spring Flower Show as the “RHS Malvern Spring Festival” and to celebrate that, they were giving away £3000 bursaries to help fund first timers in a new category of show gardens called the “Festival Gardens”. I decided fairly quickly to have a go and the design came very easily as having only 15 meter square to play with, the design needed to be simple. Once all the documents were sent off we did not think about it much, there was nothing to do apart from waiting and luckily for us the office phone was starting to ring again! It was on the 14th of March that we had confirmation that our design had been selected along with 3 others by the RHS panel.

Malvern Spring Festival 25 04 2014

At this point panic started to set in, as I feared that we couldn’t afford to do it. It was only at this stage in the process that we learnt the RHS where only giving us half of the bursary, the remainder would be paid at the end of the show once breakdown had been completed and the site was given the all clear by the organisers.”

With our design accepted so late in the day we had very little time to find the extra funding needed to top up the kitty, but it’s amazing how time pressures can make you focus. Having the RHS backing also helped enlist other sponsors.

The plants, hedges and all the hard landscaping materials were sourced, but we couldn’t find the specimen trees which were key to the design. It was now the last week in March, the end of the bare root season, and still we hadn’t found all of our trees. Finally, Lorenzo got a call from a nurseryman who had tracked down the last three trees from a nursery in Germany. It was the last day of lifting when we received an urgent email: are you taking the trees? All we had to go on was a poor quality photo. Without the trees we didn’t want to continue. We took them, hoping that these skinny looking ugly ducklings would turn into the magnificent swans we needed.

As well as having the RHS bursary, the designers of the Four Festival Garden were mentored through the build by the principal of a major design school in the area. The support and advice we got from her and from Nina Acton, the events co-ordinator for the Three Counties Showground was superb. For first timers, having someone on hand to reassure you is invaluable. The build wasn’t all plain sailing; the contractor who we had engaged to build our small wall didn’t turn up. It was at this stage that the fabled camaraderie which exhibitors say exists between those at the ground became apparent. A landscaper from another garden came over between jobs to build our wall, which he then also rendered for us, before being whisked off to finish the garden he was originally working on. Tools appeared when they were needed and disappeared just as quickly. The elves were at work. As we didn’t have a contractor we did all of the hard landscaping ourselves. I can’t take any of the credit for all the heavy jobs, which Lorenzo undertook as if he had been a professional landscaper for years. I can though, take half of the credit for the pebble path. Neither of us had done anything like this before. Having failed to find a video on YouTube on “how to build a show quality pebble path” we just got stuck in. Ignorance, as they say, is bliss. The plants arrived on the Wednesday afternoon; it took us all day Thursday to place them and then the Friday to plant them up. We were on schedule. The plants had time to naturally reposition themselves before judging on the Wednesday and we were able to primp and preen to our hearts’ content. We were more than lucky with the weather during the build; the week of the show was quite something else, and judging took place in torrential rain and extremely high winds. Malvern is windy at the best of times, but this was excessive. From eight in the morning until nine at night we waited, wet, cold, and buffeted by the wind, for the medal announcements. Luckily one of the larger show gardens had built a sunken dining area with a pizza oven which had been burning all day, so as the evening drew to a close we all huddled together to keep warm. When the results finally came in, just after 9.00pm we were too tired to take it all in, as all we wanted to do was go home to a hot bath. The wonderful thing about RHS Malvern was that the next day, two of the judges came round to each of the gardens to talk through why we received the medal we did. This was so helpful. They were really engaging and very generous in their comments. We learnt a great deal as to how the panel think!

If anyone is thinking of taking their first steps into the world of show gardens, then RHS Malvern is the place to start. The support is fantastic, the setting is beautiful and the experience is very rewarding… Though now we’re hooked and can’t wait to do another one!

Don't’ forget to pack your thermals!

To contact LSV Gardens & Associates please click here

Wednesday

One Size Doesn’t Fit All: EU Legislation Could Ban the Sale of 100’s Common Garden Plants

Gardeners may be required to dig up and burn many of our favourite garden plants and Garden Centres and Nurseries, banned from selling 100’s of shrubs and herbaceous plants because of new EU legislation.

103-bonfire-23-janThe EU has announced today that they are planning to ban the sale of 100’s of plants across Europe to stem to flow of invasive alien species (IAS).  A good idea in principal, however this proposal is poorly thought through and; like so many EU directives “one size doesn’t fit all”

One mans weed is another mans prize specimen and what might be considered invasive in one country, could be considered hard to grow in another.  The problem is that this legislation doesn’t take this into account. 100’s of our favourite garden plants, could be caught up in this blanket ban.

This would mean it would be illegal to sell for example rhododendrons because Rhododendron ponticum (a very invasive species) is in the parentage of as many as 300 garden plants. This doesn’t mean that all these are invasive, however the Royal Horticultural Society are very concerned about the lack of clarity around the new powers.

Back in September 2013 the European Commission outlined its plans to tackle the continent's invasive species. IAS are non-native plants or animals that have no natural predators, spread rapidly and overwhelm an area's native flora and fauna

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). held a conference in Switzerland and as a result of this the EU came up with a ban on the possession, transport, selling or growing of species deemed as of "Union Concern".

The list was originally going to be restricted to 50, but will now have no limit. It is not clear which species will be banned.

Wednesday's report from the Environmental Audit Committee welcomes the strengthening of the rules. Committee chairwoman Joan Walley MP said: "The UK has to be ready to take on board the step changes that there will be as a result of the European decision.

Unfortunately for gardeners, Ms Walley who obviously isn’t a gardener herself, does appreciate the implications behind this legislation.

The Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) currently has its own guidelines on restricted species.So why do we need further legislation from the EU?

Nobody is denying that IAS are a problem, but If this is allowed to go ahead, gardeners could be sleep waling into a situation where their favourite garden plants are considered illegal to sell and grow.

 

Monday

Chelsea 2014 Review: The Telegraph Garden

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This year’s Telegraph garden is designed by Tommaso del Buono and Paul Gazerwitz  and is supposed to be Italian inspired, with a modern twist.  This is the first time I have seen the proposed plan and to be honest, I am a little disappointed.

Click Here to see the Telegraph Article

Why? ……Because I have been looking forward to seeing their entry, especially after seeing the beautiful examples of their work on their website http://delbuono-gazerwitz.co.uk/

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They appear to have 2 distinct, almost opposing styles of design.  The first ‘contemporary classical’ using a formal axial design and the second  heavily plant based, using herbaceous perennials interspersed with topiary. I particularly liked the clean simple lines of their gardens and particularly liked the their “Topiary no flowers approach to gardening” which relies more on light and shadow, form and shape to provide the  visual interest.

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Their other style, relies heavily on planting and while nice, can be seen in many other designers portfolios.

What concerns me about their Chelsea exhibit, is that it appears to be a pastiche of both style -neither one thing or the other. I would surmise that being a design partnership, Buono favours the contemporary classic and Gazerwitz  the horticultural fluff. But not having met them, I can only speculate that the coming together to create this exhibit, has been an uneasy compromise of both designer’s work.

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The plan is based on a simple grid system and designed to be viewed from both the side and the front, although the front view is likely to give the best overall impression of the garden.  In the Telegraph article they describe the garden

“as to adhere to the guiding principles of Italian horticultural tradition, but with a modern slant, and will be refreshingly simple in nature.”

If I squint, I can just about see the Italian influence,  but could “refreshingly simple” be another description for dull?

A central formal lawn (seen in so many Chelsea gardens in the past) is bordered by a stone path (or is that a simply a mowing edge, dependent on the vigour of the topiary?) The flower borders are minimal in width and they will struggle to create anything crowd pleasing in those.

The one unknown in all this is the topiary at both ends.  If they can find trees of a sufficient size and maturity to create the canopy roof they talk about, then they may just pull it off.

Having said this, I am unconvinced by the way the tree trucks interfere with the usable space on the rear terrace, rendering it useless as a dinning space and only fit for a few chairs.

While critiquing a garden from plan is very difficult, the technical execution of its building will be paramount to its success or failure.  The six figure budget will almost certainly guarantee it a gold medal, but will it be a best in show – I personally don’t think so.

Let us know what you think,  Do you agree or disagree?

Tuesday

Fruit Tree Specification & Rootstocks Guide

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When specifying fruit trees, variety and rootstock are the two most important factors. Almost all fruit trees are grafted onto rootstocks. The rootstock is the most important factor in determining the vigour and eventual size of the tree.

The choice of rootstock will therefore determine the suitability of the tree for the position and the form in which you intend to grow it. Please find below a list of rootstocks and their characteristics, including mature height, spread, Planting distance, yield and form types.


Apple

1. Apples

 

Apple:  M27  (Very dwarfing )

Requirements: Good soil conditions. Ground should be clear of weeds and grass. Permanent staking required. Water in dry conditions.

Mature height: 4-6ft (1.2-1.8m)

Spread: 5ft (1.5m)

Planting distance: 4-5 ft (1.2-1.5m) apart, 6ft (1.8m) between rows

Mature yield: 10-15lb (4.5-7kg)

Bearing age: 2 years

Suitable forms: Dwarf pyramid, centre leader, step-over

 

Apple:  M9  (Dwarfing )

Requirements
Good soil conditions. Ground should be clear of weeds and grass. Permanent staking required. Water in dry conditions.

Mature height: 6-8ft (1.8-2.4m)

Spread: 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 8-10ft (2.4-3m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Mature yield: 25-50lb (11-23kg)

Bearing age: 2/3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, centre leader, cordon

 

Apple:  M26  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Can be grown in all reasonable soil conditions including grass orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 8-12ft (2.4-3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Mature yield: 30-80lb (13.5-36kg)

Bearing age: 2/3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, centre leader, cordon, minaret, espalier, container

 

Apple:  MM106  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including grassed orchards and relatively poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-13ft (3-4m)

Spread: 13ft (4m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Mature yield: 50-100lb (23-56kg)

Bearing age: 3/4 years

Suitable forms: Half standard, bush, cordon, espalier, container

 

Apple:  MM111  (Vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including grassed orchards and poor soils. Staking preferable but not necessary if planted as a one year old. Stake for first 3 years if planted as 2/3 year trees.

Mature height: 13-15ft (4-4.5m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 15ft (4.5m) apart, 20ft (6m) between rows

Mature yield: 100-400lb (45-180kg)

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Standard, half standard, large espalier

 

Apple:  M25  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including grassed orchards and poor soils. Staking preferable but not necessary if planted as a one year old. Stake for first 3 years if planted as 2/3 year trees.

Mature height: Over15ft (4.5m)

Spread: 20ft (6m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Mature yield: 200-400lb (90-180kg)

Bearing age: 5/6 years

Suitable forms: Standard

Pear

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Pear:  Quince C  (Dwarfing )

Requirements: Good fertile soil. Ground should be clear of weeds and grass. Stake for at least the first 5 years and preferably permanently.

Mature height: 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 9ft (2.7m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age : 3/4 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, centre leader, cordon, espalier

 

Pear:  Quince A  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including relatively poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height : 10-12ft (3-3.6m )

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Suitable Forms: Half standard, bush, cordon, espalier, container

 

Pear:  Pyrodwarf  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements; A new relatively dwarfing pear rootstock. Can be used for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: Over 15ft (4.5m)

Spread : 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 15ft (4.5m) apart, 20ft (6m) between rows

Bearing age; 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Half Standard

 

Pear:  Pyrus  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including poor soils and grassed orchards. Staking preferable for the first 3 years.

Mature height: Over 20ft (6m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance; 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age; 5/6 years

Suitable forms: Standard

Plum

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Plum:  VVA-1  (Dwarfing )

Requirements; A new dwarfing rootstock for plums. Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height: 7-9ft (2-2.7m)

Spread; 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 8ft (2.5m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Plum:  Pixy  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height: 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread; 10ft (3m)

Planting distance; 10ft (3m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age; 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Plum:  WA-VIT  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: A new semi-dwarfing rootstock for plums, damsons, apricots and peaches. Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively dry conditions. Stake for the first 5 years

Mature height; 9-11ft (2.7-3.3m)

Spread: 11ft (3.3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4 years

Suitable forms: Bush, Half Standard, Fan

 

Plum:  St. Julien A  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m)

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms; Half standard, bush, fan

 

Plum:  Brompton  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: Over 15ft (4.5m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Standard

Peach

peaches

Peach:  VVA-1  (Dwarfing )

Requirements: A new dwarfing rootstock for plums. Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height: 7-9ft (2-2.7m)

Spread: 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 8ft (2.5m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Peach:  Pixy  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height: 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 10ft (3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Peach:  WA-VIT  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: A new semi-dwarfing rootstock for plums, damsons, apricots and peaches. Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively dry conditions. Stake for the first 5 years

Mature height; 9-11ft (2.7-3.3m)

Spread; 11ft (3.3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age; 4 years

Suitable forms; Bush, Half Standard, Fan

 

Peach:  St Julien A  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m)

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age; 4/5 years

Suitable forms; Half standard, bush, fan

 

Peach:  Krymsk 86  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: A new rootstock suitable for peaches, nectarines and almonds. Can be used for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: n/a

Spread: n/a

Planting distance: n/a

Bearing age; 4/5 years

Suitable forms; n/a

 

Peach:  Brompton  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height; Over 15ft (4.5m)

Spread; 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms; Standard

Nectarine

Nectarine_Fantasia

Nectarine:  VVA-1  (Dwarfing )

Requirements: A new dwarfing rootstock for plums. Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height; 7-9ft (2-2.7m)

Spread: 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 8ft (2.5m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Nectarine:  Pixy  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height; 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 10ft (3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Nectarine:  WA-VIT  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: A new semi-dwarfing rootstock for plums, damsons, apricots and peaches. Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively dry conditions. Stake for the first 5 years

Mature height: 9-11ft (2.7-3.3m)

Spread: 11ft (3.3m)

Planting distance; 10ft (3m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4 years

Suitable forms: Bush, Half Standard, Fan

 

Nectarine:  St Julien A  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m)

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Half standard, bush, fan

 

Nectarine:  Krymsk 86  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: A new rootstock suitable for peaches, nectarines and almonds. Can be used for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: n/a

Spread: n/a

Planting distance: n/a

Bearing age; 4/5 years

Suitable forms; n/a

 

Nectarine:  Brompton  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: Over 15ft (4.5m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Standard

Apricot

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Apricot:  VVA-1  (Dwarfing )

Requirements; A new dwarfing rootstock for plums. Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height; 7-9ft (2-2.7m)

Spread; 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance; 8ft (2.5m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age; 3 years

Suitable forms; Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Apricot:  Pixy  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height; 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread; 10ft (3m)

Planting distance; 10ft (3m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age; 3 years

Suitable forms; Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Apricot:  WA-VIT  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: A new semi-dwarfing rootstock for plums, damsons, apricots and peaches. Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively dry conditions. Stake for the first 5 years

Mature height: 9-11ft (2.7-3.3m)

Spread; 11ft (3.3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age; 4 years

Suitable forms: Bush, Half Standard, Fan

 

Apricot:  Torinel  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: A new rootstock suitable for apricots. Can be used for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m)

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance; 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age; 4/5 years

Suitable forms; Half standard, bush, fan

 

Apricot:  St Julien A  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m)

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms; Half standard, bush, fan

 

Apricot:  Brompton  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: Over 15ft (4.5m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Standard

Cherry

CherryLapins

Cherry:  Gisela 5  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Good fertile soil. Ground should be cleared of weeds and grass. Staking required for the first 5 years. Very sensitive to systemic herbicides such as Glyphosate the use of which should be avoided around young trees.

Mature height: 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 10ft (3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, small fan

 

Cherry:  Colt  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including relatively poor soils and grassed orchards. Staking preferable but not necessary if planted as a one year old. Stake for first 3 years if planted as 2/3 year trees.

Mature height: 12-15ft (3-4.5m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 15ft (4.5m) apart, 20ft (6.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Half standard, bush

 

Cherry:  F12/1  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including poor soils and grassed orchards. Staking preferable but not necessary if planted as a one year old. Stake for first 3 years if planted as 2/3 year trees.

Mature height: Over 20ft (6m)

Spread: 20ft (6m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 5/6 years

Suitable forms: Standard

Medlar

Mespilus

Medlar:  Quince C  (Dwarfing )

Requirements: Good fertile soil. Ground should be clear of weeds and grass. Stake for at least the first 5 years and preferably permanently.

Mature height; 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 9ft (2.7m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3/4 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, centre leader, cordon, espalier

 

Medlar:  Quince A  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including relatively poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m )

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age; 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Suitable Forms: Half standard, bush, cordon, espalier, container

 

Medlar:  Pyrodwarf  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements; A new relatively dwarfing pear rootstock. Can be used for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: Over 15ft (4.5m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 15ft (4.5m) apart, 20ft (6m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Half Standard

 

Medlar:  Pyrus  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including poor soils and grassed orchards. Staking preferable for the first 3 years.

Mature height: Over 20ft (6m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance; 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 5/6 years

Suitable form: Standard

 

Medlar:  Crataegus  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) is commonly used as a rootstock for medlars. Suitable for a wide range of soils including grassed orchards and relatively poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m )

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 15ft (4.5m) apart, 20ft (6.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 3/4 years

Suitable forms; Bush, half standard

Quince

Quince06

Quince:  Quince C  (Dwarfing )

Requirements: Good fertile soil. Ground should be clear of weeds and grass. Stake for at least the first 5 years and preferably permanently.

Mature height: 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 9ft (2.7m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3/4 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, centre leader, cordon, espalier

 

Quince:  Quince A  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including relatively poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m )

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age
4/5 years

Suitable forms
Suitable Forms: Half standard, bush, cordon, espalier, container

 

Quince:  Pyrus  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including poor soils and grassed orchards. Staking preferable for the first 3 years.

Mature height: Over 20ft (6m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 5/6 years

Suitable forms; Standard

Almond

almond-tree-01

Almond:  St Julien A  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m)

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Half standard, bush, fan

Bullace

Sloes_On_Tree_5589

Bullace:  VVA-1  (Dwarfing )

Requirements: A new dwarfing rootstock for plums. Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height: 7-9ft (2-2.7m)

Spread: 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 8ft (2.5m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Bullace:  Pixy  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height: 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 10ft (3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Bullace:  WA-VIT  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: A new semi-dwarfing rootstock for plums, damsons, apricots and peaches. Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively dry conditions. Stake for the first 5 years

Mature height; 9-11ft (2.7-3.3m)

Spread: 11ft (3.3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4 years

Suitable forms: Bush, Half Standard, Fan

 

Bullace:  St Julien A  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height; 10-12ft (3-3.6m)

Spread; 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Half standard, bush, fan

 

Bullace:  Brompton  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: Over 15ft (4.5m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Standard

Cherry Plum

prune5

Cherry Plum:  VVA-1  (Dwarfing )

Requirements: A new dwarfing rootstock for plums. Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height: 7-9ft (2-2.7m)

Spread: 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 8ft (2.5m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Cherry Plum:  Pixy  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height: 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 10ft (3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Cherry Plum:  WA-VIT  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements; A new semi-dwarfing rootstock for plums, damsons, apricots and peaches. Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively dry conditions. Stake for the first 5 years

Mature height: 9-11ft (2.7-3.3m)

Spread: 11ft (3.3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4 years

Suitable forms: Bush, Half Standard, Fan

 

Cherry Plum:  St Julien A  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m)

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Half standard, bush, fan

 

Cherry Plum:  Brompton  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: Over 15ft (4.5m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Standard

Damson

tree

Damson:  VVA-1  (Dwarfing )

Requirements: A new dwarfing rootstock for plums. Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height: 7-9ft (2-2.7m)

Spread: 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 8ft (2.5m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Damson:  Pixy  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Requires good fertile soil and ground cleared of weeds and grass. Stake for the first 5 years. Requires watering in dry conditions.

Mature height: 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 10ft (3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Bearing age: 3 years

Suitable forms; Bush, pyramid, small fan

 

Damson:  WA-VIT  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: A new semi-dwarfing rootstock for plums, damsons, apricots and peaches. Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively dry conditions. Stake for the first 5 years

Mature height: 9-11ft (2.7-3.3m)

Spread: 11ft (3.3m)

Planting distance: 10ft (3m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4 years

Suitable forms: Bush, Half Standard, Fan

 

Damson:  St Julien A  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including relatively poor soil and grassed orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 10-12ft (3-3.6m)

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Half standard, bush, fan

 

Damson:  Brompton  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for most soil conditions including poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: Over 15ft (4.5m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Standard

Crab Apple

appletree

Crab Apple:  M27  (Very dwarfing )

Requirements: Good soil conditions. Ground should be clear of weeds and grass. Permanent staking required. Water in dry conditions.

Mature height; 4-6ft (1.2-1.8m)

Spread: 5ft (1.5m)

Planting distance: 4-5 ft (1.2-1.5m) apart, 6ft (1.8m) between rows

Mature yield: 10-15lb (4.5-7kg)

Bearing age: 2 years

Suitable forms: Dwarf pyramid, centre leader, step-over

 

Crab Apple:  M9  (Dwarfing )

Requirements: Good soil conditions. Ground should be clear of weeds and grass. Permanent staking required. Water in dry conditions.

Mature height; 6-8ft (1.8-2.4m)

Spread: 9ft (2.7m)

Planting distance: 8-10ft (2.4-3m) apart, 12ft (3.6m) between rows

Mature yield; 25-50lb (11-23kg)

Bearing age: 2/3 years

Suitable forms: Bush, pyramid, centre leader, cordon

 

Crab Apple:  M26  (Semi-dwarfing )

Requirements: Can be grown in all reasonable soil conditions including grass orchards. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height: 8-10ft (2.4-3m)

Spread: 12ft (3.6m)

Planting distance: 8-12ft (2.4-3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Mature yield: 30-80lb (13.5-36kg)

Bearing age: 2/3 years

Suitable forms; Bush, pyramid, centre leader, cordon, minaret, espalier, container

 

Crab Apple:  MM106  (Semi-vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including grassed orchards and relatively poor soils. Stake for the first 5 years.

Mature height; 10-13ft (3-4m)

Spread: 13ft (4m)

Planting distance: 12ft (3.6m) apart, 15ft (4.5m) between rows

Mature yield: 50-100lb (23-56kg)

Bearing age; 3/4 years

Suitable forms; Half standard, bush, cordon, espalier, container

 

Crab Apple:  MM111  (Vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including grassed orchards and poor soils. Staking preferable but not necessary if planted as a one year old. Stake for first 3 years if planted as 2/3 year trees.

Mature height: 13-15ft (4-4.5m)

Spread: 15ft (4.5m)

Planting distance: 15ft (4.5m) apart, 20ft (6m) between rows

Mature yield: 100-400lb (45-180kg)

Bearing age: 4/5 years

Suitable forms: Standard, half standard, large espalier

 

Crab Apple:  M25  (Very vigorous )

Requirements: Suitable for a wide range of soils including grassed orchards and poor soils. Staking preferable but not necessary if planted as a one year old. Stake for first 3 years if planted as 2/3 year trees.

Mature height : Over15ft (4.5m)

Spread: 20ft (6m)

Planting distance: 20ft (6m) apart, 25ft (7.5m) between rows

Mature yield: 200-400lb (90-180kg)

Bearing age: 5/6 years

Suitable forms: Standard

Steps: A Design Opportunity

How to design a flight of garden steps

b1c172b4c20a1550ab58ab8f008fd2a1 Steps are a design opportunity. On any site with significant level differences, the design of changes in level is important for appearance, convenience and safety. The size and shape of external steps in new buildings is governed by the local Building Regulations. This control is mainly directed at disabled access to the main entrance but there is always a legal obligation to design safely.

The rise and going (tread) dimensions of a formal flight of stairs should be constant. An unexpected difference of only 15mm in the riser can cause people to stumble.

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Designed  by Dieguez Fridman Architects. As these trees grow and leaf out, there will be such a fabulous contrast between the grey and the green. The lighting is placed so strategically and highlights the upward movement of the space.

People quite rightly expect that formal steps will have a consistency which enables them to walk up and down them with a steady rhythm. Adjacent flights of stairs should also have identical dimensions. Treads should be level, although a small drainage fall from back to nosing of say 1 : 60 max. would be beneficial. This would also apply to the ground at the top and bottom of the steps and any intermediate landings.

Natural stone steps created as part of a rockery might be justifiably rugged, uneven and steep but don't mix formal and natural steps to catch the user unawares.

The human effort needed to walk up stairs or steps is often expressed in the formula

"twice the rise plus the going equals...”.The assumption is that it requires twice the effort to step up by a given distance as it does to step forward. For example, if you decreased the rise by 20mm and increased the tread by 40mm you would still have a flight of steps that took the same amount of physical effort to climb. For external steps it is usual to set a range for this formula of 2R + G = limited to between 550mm and 700mm. (see BS8200 and compare Building Regulations.)

2014-02-25_10-17-51

It is generally accepted that external steps should be shallower than internal stairs to take account of the fact that users may be admiring a view and normally there is an absence of a handrail on which to maintain their balance. As a rule of thumb I would suggest you choose risers between 120 and 170mm and treads between 280 minimum and 450mm with a preference for 300mm or more; then check the sizes against the 2R+G = between 550 and 700mm formula.

If you intend users to take an additional pace between risers add at least 700mm on to the tread dimension. If, in addition, you want to combine steps and a ramp to form a stepped ramp, (see Princess of Wales greenhouse at Kew) then a dimension of between 1m and 2m between risers is required with a maximum gradient on the ramp of 1 : 15. Although not ideal, it is possible for push- chairs, wheelbarrows and lawnmowers to be wheeled up or down such a stepped ramp.

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Tim Davies Landscaping. floating concrete steps and plantings at this entryway.

Use of overhanging nosings of 15 - 25mm is especially useful for short treads of 300mm or less. This helps to prevent stubbing one's toe against the riser. Any more than 25mm and the overhang of the tread above may become a tripping hazard. The Building Regulations Part M advocates rounded nosings to minimise tripping.

2014-02-25_10-32-32

Single steps are also a potential hazard because the small change in level may not be seen. If a single step is unavoidable, ensure that colour contrast and/or texture of the paving surfaces give adequate warning.

Preferably use a flight of at least 3 steps or alternatively use a ramp. To reduce the seriousness of falling down steps, the maximum number of steps in each flight should be limited to 12 (approx.1.8m vertical height) and never more than 16 steps without a landing.

If you would like to learn more about garden & landscape design why not join us on a professional online diploma course and start a career as a landscape designer see http://www.garden-design-courses.co.uk/

Wednesday

CDM2014 Update

The latest word is that CDM2014 is more likely to be CDM2015 as it is unlikely that any change to legislation will come into force until April 2015 at the earliest. With an election in May 2015 it is possible that it may be an October 2015 enactment.

piPlanningSupervisorsWe understand that the HSE are still planning to hold a 3 month industry consultation period.

In brief we believe that the HSE may be proposing:

  • Removal of the independent CDM Co-ordinator role and placing Design Phase health and safety co-ordination with a 'Principal Designer' (working title).
  • Removal of the Appendix 4 Competence Assessment criteria.
  • Placing construction phase co-ordination duties with the Principal Contractor.
  • Full application of CDM Regulations to all projects with more than one contractor on site (including domestic projects).
  • Placing client duties for domestic projects with the first appointee (architect or contractor).

Read the HSE's Board Paper "Regulation in the Construction Industry" to find our more about their plans.

We are now anticipating publication of their proposals in January 2014 with the consultation to follow during February March and April.

Saturday

2014 Construction Design & Management Regulation

Revised CDM Regulations and guidance will come into force in October 2014:

CDM-2014-Plan-Manage-Monitor

CDM does not just apply to large building projects, and the proposals will seek to underline that the Regulations also cover smaller projects, including most domestic work, building maintenance and landscaping projects.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) aims to deliver core guidance on how to manage health and safety on-site, and provide a "clear interpretation" of the revised Regulations. This will be supported by a practical guide to managing health and safety on small construction projects, and a number of sector-specific guides for "typical small construction projects. (Possibly including the landscape industry)

There will be much more emphasis on the need for those involved in construction-related activity to follow the general requirements of CDM, and less emphasis on the additional requirements that apply to 'notifiable' (e.g. larger building site) projects.

Key references to safety pre-qualification requirements are set to disappear, which is expected to leave the door ajar for pre-qualification guide PAS 91 and prequalification questionnaire (PQQ) umbrella scheme SSIP, allowing them to assume a bigger role in the industry.

The HSE has been careful not to release other specific details in advance of the consultation, but in addition to the expected removal of the current 'CDM coordinator' role, a new role is set to appear – the 'principal designer'.